RVs on Fire

OnFire

I came across this post on the iRV2 forum. The discussion was based on an unfortunate incident where a Jeep being towed by an RV caught fire. That incident was reported here.

I then came across this video.

RVs catching fire? Does that happen very often?

I decided to ask Google.

RVFires

About 263,000 hits in the News. I went through the first few pages, fire after fire.

We do have a small fire extinguisher in our coach. There is no way that it would be able to contain the type of RV fires that Google showed.

I decided to do a bit more digging. It turns out that in Canada, the Council of Canadian Fire Marshals and Fire Commissioners keeps track of this sort of data. For the province of Ontario, during 2007 — the most recent report that I could find — there were 6,347 fires. 60 of them involved a Motor Home, Camper or Trailer. RVs on fire accounted for less than 1% of all fires in Ontario. As a percentage of the total RVs on the road in Ontario? I don’t know. But I would hazard to guess that there are at least 60,000 which brings 60 down to a very small percentage of RVs that catch fire in any given year.

In the United States, the average seems to be roughly 3,000 RV fires in a given year. RVs on fire account for about 1% of all fires in that country as well. Bear in mind that the statistics are fairly rough if you go into more detail — highway fires versus stationary fires. But you get the idea. The risk of fire is certainly a factor however it is not a common feature of owning and operating an RV.

Maintain your RV, do your vehicle inspections and be safe on the road.

Fires can happen anywhere whether you are in an RV or in a house.

 

RV Blogs We Follow

Follow

Well, it turns out that our blog is not the only one focused on the RV lifestyle. Thank heavens.

I have been blogging since 2004, which seems like such a long time ago now, and my personal blog gets a lot of traffic. The RV Castaways site, being new, is just starting to build. If you are visiting us for the first time, welcome!

We have been following a lot of blogs since we started our journey into retirement. There are, of course, many sites that we visit every once in a while and, no doubt, a vast number of them that we have never visited at all.

Here are a few of our favourites.

Gone With The Wynns

A very impressive website created by a very impressive couple. In one sense, they almost singlehandedly convinced us to make our dream of travelling extensively in an RV a reality. Jason and Nikki have left the RV community to explore somewhere else, something to do with water I think, and we do miss their RV stories however the spirit of adventure still continues. One of our favourite sites and we continue to follow them on their new adventures.

RV Love

Marc and Julie fulltime in their RV even though they are still working. And they have really upped their game with their newly designed website. I know how much work it takes to build a quality website and to produce quality videos. They put a lot of effort into creating great content and their videos have helped us with a lot of our questions about the RV lifestyle.

RV Geeks

Peter and John have a wide following due, in part, to their wonderful how-to videos. We have learned so much from this website. Everything from how to empty our black tanks to leveling our coach.

Wheeling It

It was this post, 10 Things I Wish I’d Known Before Fulltime RVing, that introduced us to Nina and Paul. Nina posts regularly about their travels and she does an amazing job reviewing the campsites they visit as well as the process they follow to plan their travels here, here and here.

Outside Our Bubble

Well, what can I say? David and Brenda do march to the beat of a different drummer! Highly energetic and passionate, we have gained a lot of insight from them on both the technical and non-technical aspects of the RV lifestyle. And David had founded AVS Forum many years back, a site I used to visit all the time. A guy who is passionate about technology and audio? Of course I love his website.

iRV2.com

I go here every day. I spend most of my time on the Newmar Owner’s Forum. Such a great community of people here. Although, for now, I have been lurking. Still a bit shy to post.

Life In The Slow Lane

I’m not sure how I stumbled onto Mike’s blog but he seemed to be in a very similar place in life to me. He was nearing retirement, looking at purchasing a Newmar Dutch Star to go travel fulltime, and his approach to blogging was very helpful to us particularly with his journey to purchase his RV. We’ve traded a few emails and he does post from time to time on the iRV forums. He always has lots of great content to share.

The Good, The Bad and the RV

Mike and Karla have created a really great website. They also travel in a Newmar Dutch Star. Mike has taught me a lot about how to plan for and equip an RV. Check out some of his thoughts on How To’s and Gear and Gadgets.

 

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas

Winter

I hear you. It is too soon.

However, the storage facility for our coach has already been in contact wanting us to set the date for bringing the Castaway in for the winter.

We will miss her.

We have travel plans for the coach in September and early October. Within six weeks or so, I will have to ponder this question: how to winterize our motorhome?

From what I have read, there are two basic approaches although I will offer up a third:

  1. Drain all water and use an air compressor
  2. Use RV antifreeze
  3. Take the coach to Florida and forget about winter

The RVgeeks have a great video on winterizing the RV:

Newmar has posted a couple of articles here and here.

And, for a really detailed set of links on winterizing your RV, check out this post on iRV2.

Too soon.

Winegard Rayzar Automatic Antenna

TVAntenna

Our coach, the Castaway, is equipped with three television sets.

When I was a kid, we only had one. A black and white TV set. No remote. But we did have a big TV antenna on top of the roof.

You see, back then, this thing called cable TV wasn’t in the market.

We were able to bring in a handful of channels from our big TV antenna, five in all. Two were American stations, two were English language Canadian stations and one was a French language Canadian station.

Yes. Those were the days my friend.

Our coach has a satellite dish with access to hundreds of channels, a digital antenna which finds whatever digital TV channels are in range, along with an extensive array of digital video entertainment from Blu-Ray and various Internet-based video channels.

So why do I even care about a limited set of cable TV channels that may be available when I am at a site?

Well, I wanted to see if I could connect to cable TV as part of the shakedown of the coach.

I went and purchased a 50-foot cable and I tried to hook it up when we were at our site in Petoskey, Michigan.

First problem: where, oh where do I connect the cable? It was obvious where the cable TV connection was at the site as it was at the same post as the electrical hookup.

I could not find a cable TV connection on the service side of the coach. One of our neighbours, also in a Dutch Star, was kind enough to point out where the connection was housed. It was hiding under a covered port in the same part of the basement compartment as the shore power reel.

Sigh.

Well, I went ahead and connected the cable from the coach to the post. So everything should work now, right?

Inside the coach, our TVs allow us to automatically scan and program channels coming from either a cable TV service or an outdoor TV antenna. Under the TV’s system setup, you make a choice on the source, antenna or cable, and then let the TV set do the work.

Only, no cable TV channels.

I tried it several times on all three sets.

No joy.

Bad cable? Perhaps. And, until I picked up another one, I would have to make do with the several hundred other channels of video at my disposal. Which is what we wound up doing.

But it bothered me. Why wasn’t it working?

I was reading through this post on the iRV2.com website and something stood out about cable TV connections.

The Winegard Rayzar Antenna control panel.

You see that little green light in the photo?

Winegard Control Panel

The one over the button that says “ON/OFF”?

Well, it turns out that if you want to pass the Cable TV signal through to the TV sets, that little green light has to be dark otherwise the only signal present in the antenna line is the signal coming from the Winegard antenna. The cable TV signal from the site will be happily ignored.

Lots to learn about all of the various systems in our coach. Wish me luck.

America’s Largest RV Show

ReallyBigShow

Happening here.

We had gone to the Hershey show last year and we are going down again this year. Last year our focus was on narrowing our decision for a new motorhome. This year? Well, this year we would just like to enjoy the show and learn a bit more about the odds and ends of the lifestyle. We won’t need to be quite as focused in terms of where we spend our time.

I have a number of gadgets that I wouldn’t mind picking up at the show. They include:

  • Tire Pressure Management System
  • RV Level
  • Adjustable Water Pressure Regulator
  • Sewer Hose Extension
  • Package of Assorted 12V Fuses
  • Telescopic Ladder

Lorraine and I have also talked about whether we want some signage for the coach. Something that might say “Castaway” for example. I suspect we may pick up a few other items while we are down there.

We’ll also spend a lot more time exploring the various travel booths at the show. Last year we spent most of our time exploring the coaches.

We’ll still walk through many of the new coaches this year and we will probably tell ourselves that our coach is much nicer than any of the 2017 models. At least for now. That could change in another 10 years or so.

It will just be the two of us for the show. We have booked a site about an hour’s drive from Hershey. Not too far and not too close.