The Cleaver Rule

Here is a picture of our site at Swan Bay RV Resort, a nice park along the US side of the Thousand Islands near Alexandria Bay in New York State.

Site number 202. Arguably the best site in the park. Nice corner lot, right on the waterfront.

This was our view:

We paid about $150 Canadian per night at this sight. Definitely expensive however the Swan Bay RV Resort website makes the following claim:

Swan Bay Resort is the premier resort community designed with the discriminating traveler in mind. Residents and visitors of our luxury resort will enjoy: Resort-style pool; Exclusive marina access; Expansive river views seen from throughout the resort; Close proximity to the Canadian border and all that the 1000 Islands Region has to offer.

​Swan Bay Resort is your destination location for great times and luxurious living! Our gated community offers fantastic views of the St. Lawrence River, close proximity to all the attractions of the 1000 Islands Region, best-in-class amenities, and four-star service. This translates to some of the best guests and accommodations in the northeast.

So was it a premier resort? Almost.

Here is a shot of our site from the rear. To the right of our coach, in site number 201, was a travel trailer.

Looks okay though. Slideout on the service pedestal side and access door to the trailer on site 201’s patio side (outside the frame on the right).

It was a bit odd to see them pull in. Travel trailers are fine for back in sites and pull through sites. I was surprised that they were able to reserve this pull in site for their rig.

But pull in they did.

There wasn’t much room for their pickup truck to pull the trailer up onto the concrete pad and find a way to get the truck back out of the site. They managed. The grass was wet and soft. Lots of damage to the front of the site from the tires of their pickup truck.

The following evening at around 8pm there was quite the excitement on site number 201. A thunderstorm had entered the area and it was raining heavily. For roughly an hour or so, our neighbours proceeded to move their trailer out and reposition their rig as if they were now in a back in site. In the pouring rain. They seemed frantic.

Why did they decide to move their trailer at that moment?

And what did that mean to us?

For $150 Canadian a night, we were now sharing our patio with site number 201.

Apparently another travel trailer, also on a waterfront pull in site, had been told by management that they had to back in and use the patio opposite their entrance door side. They complained to management that the travel trailer in site number 201 had “pulled through” when they had been told that they could not do the same on their site.

Management then apparently told the folks in site number 201 that they had to reposition their trailer or leave the park.

Well, we were not all at happy about having to share our patio side. We asked management to request site number 201 use the patio opposite their entrance door so that we did not have to share our patio. They refused. We asked management to move us to another waterfront site alongside some other Class A vehicles. Management refused. We were told that all of the waterfront sites were booked (which was not the case).

Management did provide us credit for one night’s stay for the inconvenience. However, we were not looking for a discount. We had paid a premium price for a site with what we thought was a dedicated patio.

We spoke with the people in site number 201 about how we would go about sharing the patio and they assured us that they would be at another site for most of their stay. And sometimes they were.

As we checked out on the Friday, management told us that they had put in a new rule. They named it the Cleaver rule. Effective immediately, all of their pull in sites would be restricted to Class A, B and C motor coaches only.

I went on their site today and sure enough, the Cleaver rule is in effect. Their waterfront sites are now MOTOR COACH ONLY (their emphasis).

When we had booked the site, there was no mention that we might have to share a patio side with a neighbour. If that had been the case, we would have opted for a different site where we wouldn’t have to share the patio.

Other than this incident, our experience at Swan Bay was fine. Great waterfront views. Excellent Internet. Good services at the site. I would definitely go back and I would also book the same site assuming that we wouldn’t have to share the patio.

Swan Bay Resort

We are not too far from home right now. Literally just across the Canadian/US border. Wonderful to get out with our coach for a few days. We are staying at the Swan Bay Resort in Alexandria Bay, New York for the week.

Residency Calculator

If you are a U.S. Citizen, well, the U.S. Residency Calculator won’t be of any use to you. Lorraine and I, on the other hand, will have to be very careful about the number of days we spend in the United States.

When we first started planning out our retirement, we assumed we could be Canadian Snowbirds by just crossing the border to the U.S. in November and coming back to Canada in April. Enjoy moderate weather for twelve months of the year. Striking off one of my bucket list objectives for retirement: to never be cold again.

Perfect, eh? (Sorry about the Canadian stereotype.)

It turns out to be far more complicated than staying less than six months in the U.S. in any given year.

The substantial presence test, to avoid being considered a U.S. resident for tax purposes and goodness knows we already pay a ton of taxes in Canada, includes two very important points:

  • Physically present in the U.S. for 31 days in the current year
  • A three-year total of 183 days which includes all the days spent in the current year, one-third of the days spent in the preceding year and one-sixth of the days spent in the year prior.

That means only 120 days south a year to avoid being considered a U.S. resident for tax purposes. That means leaving in November and returning to Canada at the end of February. That means missing out on my bucket list objective to never be cold again.

February is cold in Canada. Very, very cold.

The U.S. Residency Calculator is helpful to determine whether you have to be a bit more formal in terms of staying in the U.S.

A Canadian can get an exemption by filing a Form 8840 with the IRS. This allows a Canadian snowbird to stay in the U.S. for up to 182 days every year without being considered a U.S. resident for tax purposes. To qualify, you have to be in the U.S. for less than 183 days in the current year, demonstrate a home in Canada in the current year (owner or renter) and establish a closer connection to Canada than the U.S. The latter can be demonstrated in terms of where you bank, pay taxes, keep your belongings, where your drivers license was issued amongst other things.

The 8840 form can be found on the IRS website here. The form should be filed before June 15 in the year after your 182 day stay in the U.S. although the Canadian Snowbird Association recommends proactively completing and filing a new 8840 each year and maintaining copies to indicate that you are entering the U.S. as a temporary visitor from Canada.

If a snowbird loses track of time and exceeds 183 days or more, then it is possible to file an exemption under the Canada – U.S. Tax Treaty. Sounds like a really complex process though which would require lawyers and fees. Best to keep it within 182 days. At least for now.

The Canadian Retiree Visa bill, H.R. 979: Promoting Tourism to Enhance our Economy Act of 2017, could see Canadian retirees being able to spend 8 months in the U.S. (owning real estate will not be required to obtain the visa). The bill has yet to pass but if it does, we will be applying for that visa. That said, every province in Canada has residency requirements to maintain health care coverage. In Ontario, we have to be physically present in the province for at least 153 days in any 12-month period. Not sure who is counting those days but I was somewhat surprised to learn that regardless of where you pay your taxes, you are a bit of a prisoner in your own province within Canada.

Who knew travelling in retirement could be so complicated?

Big Rig Map

I came across this big rig map during one of my searches on Google. Pretty cool interactive map and should prove helpful when we are travelling stateside.

I was looking for a Class A only site in Canada similar to the ones like this one.

I haven’t found any. I’m beginning to think that they do not exist in our country.

Felonius Gru

minions

We finally made it back home from Florida. Very busy week. Lots of meetings with important folks like Gru.

Returned home to near freezing temperatures so it was a good thing that we had put the coach into storage before we left on our travels.