Myakka River Motorcoach Resort

Look at them awnings! They stayed put until we wanted them to deploy.

After a long 800km drive — almost 10 hours of continuous driving behind the wheel — we pulled into Myakka River Motorcoach Resort just minutes before closing.

They had a special welcome sign just for us at the check-in. A very nice touch to a stunning resort property. Thrilled that we get to spend a month here.

It was late and I did not have much time to take photos but I did snap a few of our site. We face the river with an incredible view.

More details about the park over the next few days.

Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort

We arrived to Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort late yesterday afternoon. Rain followed us the whole way down.

Lorraine went to the office to register while I unhooked our coach. Much to my dismay, we had “lost” one of our tow bar hitch pins.

We had made one, and only one, stop on our drive down from Mountain Falls. And that was at a Pilot in Bowman, South Carolina. Before I started to fuel the coach, I did a quick circle check to make sure everything was fine with the rig. And it was.

I guess I should have checked again before we left.

There was a pretty rough group of people in the lane beside us in a black pickup truck. They were not at the pump itself, more like twenty feet or so behind it. Outside of my visual range.

I really didn’t think much about them. There are rough people throughout Canada and the United States.

I was shocked to see that a hitch pin had been removed from the tow bar. Fortunately, the main locking pin that attaches the tow bar to the baseplate of the car was still in place. I’d hate to think what might have happened if we had lost that pin as we were travelling.

Our mission later this morning is to find some spare pins before we resume our journey south tomorrow.

Hilton Head looks best at night however I did not have my camera with me when we walked through the park last evening.

I did walk through this morning and here are a few shots to share with you.

This park has a lot of vegetation. Trees provide a canopy over much of the area and the landscaping is well developed. Most of the sites are occupied by Class A rigs. Very few Class B or C rigs. Fifth wheels are not permitted.

Some wonderful rigs like this old Prevost. Hard to make out, but the upper shades read: “Marty’s World”.

And a newer Prevost.

And look who’s here? Ryan from sortofhomeless.com. I’ve followed him for a while. And, since Lorraine and I currently do not have a stick and brick property, we can relate to being sort of homeless. Or, as someone has told us, not homeless, home free.

Sherkston Shores

A few photos to share from our time at Sherkston Shores RV Resort.

Some wonderful areas to explore particularly as there is hardly anyone here at this time of year. Most days it seems as though we have the place to ourselves.

Sherkston Shores is located on roughly 560 acres of land along the Lake Erie coast. There are somewhere over 1,700 manufactured homes and several hundred RV sites. During peak season, I would expect 4,000 or 5,000 people.

Since we have been here, perhaps a few dozen people on site. Except for the weekends. It has been busier over the past two weekends.

Most of what you will find at Sherkston Shores are manufactured homes.

Some are very nice with spectacular waterfront views.

Others are nestled high amongst the trees.

While a few have definitely seen better days and call to mind the common definition of a “trailer park”.

Most of the properties were well looked after though. In terms of the RV sites, well, they are almost exclusively 5th wheel trailers.

With several hundred sites, we have only found four Class A motorhomes. All of them a bit older and all of them gas-powered.

Our coach tends to get some attention wherever we travel in Canada. Very different from our travels in the U.S. where it is far more common to see Class A diesel pushers.

All told, this is a much nicer spot to be than at the dealer’s lot waiting for parts. We have some beautiful beachfront walks even if the weather is unseasonably cold. Reminds us that in a few weeks we will be south where it is hopefully much warmer.

Toronto, Canada

We were back in Toronto after our Norwegian cruise. Not yet home, but getting pretty close. This will be the last post about our retirement cruise. And, rather than sharing images of Toronto with all of the new, glass-encased office towers, I thought I would share a few of my images from Toronto’s Graffiti Alley.

The alley is located near Spadina Avenue and sits in between Queen Street West and Richmond Street West. A bit of a walk from the main Toronto downtown office and condo towers.

It is an alley and you will find a fair amount of garbage. Toronto is generally a safe city to visit although I’m not sure I would go to this alley at night. Best to view the graffiti during the day.

There are some parking areas along the alley and the back of these buildings are also covered in graffiti. Except for the “Authorized Parking Only” signs.

Graffiti alley spans three city blocks. It is much longer than you might expect. The artwork is continuously refreshed and, in some cases, as in the picture above, dated. I’m not sure who decides when it is okay to paint over someone’s graffiti.

This was a tourist visiting Toronto from New York City. He wanted his photo taken for his Instagram and he asked us to use his smartphone. Lorraine took that shot for him. I took this shot using my own camera.

A bit of a different view of Toronto than what most tourists see.

And so, after an amazing two weeks travelling Europe, we finally boarded the train from Toronto to head home to Kingston.

New adventures will be starting soon as we begin a longer-term journey south in our coach.

Hamburg, Germany

We returned to Hamburg after we finished our Norwegian cruise. No video to share today. Just a few pictures.

Our hotel was in an area of Hamburg called HafenCity, one of the largest urban redevelopment projects in Europe. The architecture is modern and the buildings impressive.

The city is served well by transit systems and bike paths. Many of the light rail train routes are suspended, like the one pictured below.

There are generous public spaces to be found across Hamburg. Some of them pay homage to historical figures with swords.

I did not get close to the statue to determine the source for the statue. But you could see him from quite the distance.

I love the design of European buses particularly the front mirrors. It just seems like a great way to place them on a coach. Generally do not see this design in North America and I’m not sure why.

Many of the roads in Hamburg use pavers. It creates a unique feel to the city.

Most of the historic buildings have been converted to apartments or, like this one, office space.

Closer to city centre and the office buildings are contemporary and yet draw from the past.

We loved all of the open air cafes and the number of streets that had been converted to pedestrian use only.

Water levels in Hamburg were extremely low. It may be related to an unprecedented heat wave that hit much of Europe. It was hot and humid when we arrived in Hamburg. It was hot and humid when we left Hamburg.

An example of the new architecture in HafenCity.

The Elbphilharmonie is a concert hall in HafenCity, one of the largest concert halls in the world. and it can seat over 2,000 people. You can enter the building and take escalators up to the viewing deck which is located just where the brick meets the glass.

This photo is from the viewing deck although I shot the window which offered a reflection of the city, so it really is just a picture of part of a window on the viewing deck, depending on your perspective of course. The building used some very high quality glass!

Another perspective of the docks in HafenCity.

Walking through Hamburg you will find an extensive network of pedestrian footbridges and wide walkways. This part of the city was certainly designed with people in mind.

As evening descended in Hamburg, I took a few final golden hour shots and we made our way back to the hotel.

Waking up, we had only a couple of hours to take in the city before making the long trip back home.

Generally, I reverse the order, that is if I were a coffee drinker.