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The Big Reveal of Newmar’s Super C

I am catching the big reveal of Newmar’s new Super C, the Super Star live. The RV Geeks are hosting.

VP of sales for Newmar, John Sammut has joined them for the big reveal.

First, a bit of chat with Matt Miller, the CEO of Newmar.

And finally, the newest model from Newmar.

First air ride cab, first full wall slide on a Super C.

Pass-through storage, another first for a Super C.

Interior looks a lot like a Dutch Star probably due to the full wall slide and the woodworking.

Newmar will offer a 37 and 40 foot model.

RV Geeks are impressed, they think it is comparable to a high-end diesel pusher. The Super Star can haul up to 20,000 pounds. Built on a Freightliner chassis.

RV Geeks will post videos of the new model on their channel.

No other details in terms of the chassis. No other details in terms of pricing.

Hopefully more details about the Super Star will come out soon on the Newmar website. Nothing there right now.

Drivin’ and Vibin’ got a first look and a video which provides more insight into the new machine. They are saying a price of $350,000.

Newmar Super Star

Updated: what’s next happened. You can learn more about Newmar’s Super C here.

What’s next is almost here.

Newmar just sent me an email on their new Super C Models.

Hello Richard,

Two years ago, we began research and development on our very first Super C model. And because we believe doing it better starts with reinventing how it’s been done, we put innovation at the forefront. The result comes in the form of the all-new 2020 Super Star, which you will be able to witness live from the Newmar display on March 13 at 12 pm MST / 2 pm EST!

The first and only Super C RV to feature both a full air-ride cab and a full-wall slideout, the 2020 Super Star represents a whole new way to experience the Newmar difference. Join us live from the Newmar display inside RVX on March 13 at 12 pm MST / 2 pm EST and be among the first to witness the Super C coach transformed!

You can sign up for the live stream here.

Newmar Super Star

Updated: the big reveal of Newmar’s new Super C happened. You can learn more about the big reveal here.

Newmar will be introducing new Super C models. Will they look like a Showhauler Super C?

I didn’t hear anything about these new models at the recent RV SuperShow in Tampa. Newmar will formally introduce their 2020 Super Cs at RVX 2019. RVX is a dealer-focused event intended to spur consumer interest in RVs even as the industry struggles to keep up with demand.

There will be two Super C models. One will be called a Super Star. Newmar did publish this line drawing on their dealer invitation page.

I like the idea of a Super C. A very robust platform. Safer with the engine out front. But every time I have walked through a high end Super C, like a Showhauler, I am a bit underwhelmed. The interiors are not as nice as a comparably priced diesel pusher. The tractor at the front takes about 10 to 12 feet of space from the interior of the motorhome which results in less living space than an equivalent length diesel pusher. And Class A restricted resorts, which we enjoy, obviously do not allow Super Cs in their parks.

I am very interested, though, in how Newmar will approach this new model line. Frankly, I think they might be getting too stretched as it is with 11 existing models and hundreds of floorpans and all sorts of available options. Will they be able to scale their current manufacturing process? Will they be able to maintain reasonable quality issues? How much will they charge for a luxury Super C?

We’ll find out soon. RVX takes place in March.

Loose Bolts

Check those bolts. Tom had posted to this thread on the iRV2 forum concerning loose bolts on Newmar coaches:

While heading South on I-15 near Victorville, CA yesterday, we encountered sustained 30-40 mph cross winds with intermittent higher gusts. With one particular gust, it sounded like the roof of the coach was being ripped off. I pulled over and got out the ladder to inspect and determine what happened and whether anything was damaged. What I found was that the two side lag bolts on the front support that hold the driver’s side roof facade had backed out about halfway allowing the bottom part of the facade to vibrate and move in the strong crosswinds. When I finally got to the campground, I checked all the lag bolts supporting both facades (front and rear) and found that most were loose by at least an eighth or quarter turn. We are fortunate we stopped and fixed the problem before the wind actually ripped the facade off.

When I get back home I have some minor fiberglass repair work to do. I also intend to replace all the facade lag bolts with bolts, washers, and nylon lock nuts.

Here are Tom’s photos showing one of the offending bolts that had come loose:

When Tom writes about the facade on his coach, he is referring to the body panels located at the uppermost part of the coach. On my coach, there are two of these body panels on the driver’s side and they form a ridge line, roughly 8 inches high, at the very top. They run almost the entire length of the side of the coach. On the passenger side, the facades house the Girard awnings.

These body panels are secured by bolts. Bolts that can come loose.

We have had other bolts come loose on our coach. For whatever reason, Newmar secures the body panels that cover the wheel wells at the bottom of the coach and the side radiator grill with bolts. Bolts that will come loose.

After one trip, on the driver’s side, I noticed that the rear wheel body panel was very loose and it looked as though it had come off its mount. The bolt was still there, at the very bottom of the front part of the body panel, just clinging on for perhaps another turn or so. I suspect it would have fallen off on the next trip.

I then went around the entire coach and, sure enough, every single bolt that secured a body panel had come loose.

I was concerned by this finding. A loose body panel could easily be taken by a strong wind and stripped off the side of a coach. It could cause a serious accident.

Based on Tom’s experience, the top body panels could also by taken by a strong wind.

I will climb up on the roof to ensure that the bolts attaching the top body panels are secure before our trip to California.

There is a reason why I am on the iRV2 forums every day. Learning from the experiences of others can help make the ownership experience so much better. I have gleaned far more insight into the operation and maintenance of our coach from the iRV2 forums and other RVers than I have from Newmar’s documentation.

Today’s important lesson: if you run a Newmar Dutch Star, regularly check and secure all body panel lag bolts.

Entegra Problems

We almost purchased an Entegra. It was one of three manufacturers that we seriously considered for our new coach back in 2015. The other two? Newmar and Tiffin. We went with Newmar and, despite a number of issues, we are fine with our decision.

Entegra had a good reputation prior to being acquired by Thor. And there were concerns that the acquisition would have a negative impact on Entegra.

Thor’s stock has been on quite a roll lately.

Thor’s quarterly revenue fell over 21 percent from last year. The stock took a big tumble last week after Thor released poor fiscal first-quarter results. RV sales had a 24 percent drop.

I caught an interview that Thor’s CEO, Bob Martin, did with Jim Cramer where he blamed rising tariffs on Aluminum and Steel for the negative impact on earnings.

To counteract the rising costs of production, Martin intended to cut raw costs and de-content its higher end motorcoaches. De-content means taking ancillary products and features out of these coaches. Less is more.

So what does this mean for Entegra owners?

This thread on the IRV2 forum, Has Thor changed Entegra, highlights the dilemma facing buyers of new coaches. Good product? Good service?

I suspect for most buyers, a purchase that begins to close in on half a million, can influence your opinion in one of two ways: I made a good decision or I made a bad decision. And the reason is simple enough. All of these coaches will have issues. All of them. And when you have a lot of issues, you begin to question your decision.

I am of the view that anyone looking to purchase a coach from Entegra, Newmar or Tiffin, should expect to have issues and should expect to have mixed results in terms of how the issues get resolved. This is part of the ownership experience.

I follow Glenn and Julia over at Our Great Escape. And they posted their experience here. They have a pretty harsh bottom line:

Shame on you Entegra, Bontrager stood up in front of an audience of 100 people who were Entegra owners at the 2016 Springfest and told everyone that you had always been a family business and would always be a family business with family values bla bla bla and then 3 months down the road sold out to Thor Industries. You then through Tadd Jenkins (the then president of Entegra coach) tried to calm the worried owners and told us that there would be absolutely no change apart from the name above the door, everything else will remain the same, same management team etc etc. Tadd was then pushed out closely followed by Chuck Lasley who took over from Tadd and a few other key people. This is a direct quote from Derek Bontrager :

“The day we stop listening to our customers is the day our demise begins and no one understands that better than we do.”

JOKE!

Are they listening??? Do they lie to their owners? You answer the question. I know the answer!

This is their YouTube video that describes their experience picking up their coach after servicing. Sadly, their experience is not unique.